ACS biologist’s article on senita cactus range extension published in Madroño

A manuscript coauthored by ACS biologist Stephanie Cobbold was published this year in Madroño, a journal of peer-reviewed research articles on the natural history of Western American plants. The article describes a range extension of the senita cactus (Lophocereus schottii) in Arizona. The record helps fill a gap between records from southern California and . . . → Read More: ACS biologist’s article on senita cactus range extension published in Madroño

Bald eagle populations in Arizona continue to recover

The bald eagle was listed as an endangered species nationwide until 2007, and protection under the Endangered Species Act was reinstated in 2008 in Arizona and remained until 2011. The decline of the bald eagle was mainly attributed to reproductive failure due to ingestion of toxins associated with pesticides, particularly dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), as well . . . → Read More: Bald eagle populations in Arizona continue to recover

DNA reveals ancient parrot breeder supplied US Southwest peoples

Interesting article: https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/08/dna-reveals-ancient-parrot-breeder-supplied-us-southwest-peoples/

ACS Senior Pollen Analyst, Dr. John Jones, contributes chapter to new publication.

Dr. John Jones, ACS’ Senior Pollen Analyst has contributed a Chapter to the The Archaeology of Caribbean and Circum-Caribbean Farmers (6000 BC – AD 1500) An Introduction. As the abstract states “…This book is devoted to the archaeological study of precolonial farmers in the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. Comprising 17 chapters, with a wide geographic reach stretching . . . → Read More: ACS Senior Pollen Analyst, Dr. John Jones, contributes chapter to new publication.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to delist lesser long-nosed bat

Based on input from biologists and climate change specialists, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to delist the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuenae). An evaluation of threats and an assessment of the bat’s long term viability suggest that threats to this species have been significantly reduced, such that it no longer . . . → Read More: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to delist lesser long-nosed bat